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Canada Grains Council insurance, code of practice projects receive $1.2 million

By: RealAgriculture News Team

February 12, 2020

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Two projects aimed at reducing risk for exporters and improving the sustainability claim of Canadian grain are moving forward with announced federal funding of $1.2 million. The projects are headed up by the Canada Grains Council.

More than $430,000 will be used to develop a pilot insurance product for grain exporters to address the risks they face of having their shipments rejected at the border of the importing country.

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Federal Agriculture Minister, Marie-Claude Bibeau announced the funding at CropConnect being held at Winnipeg, Man., this week.

“Canadian grains are in demand around the world because of their quality, nutrition, innovation and value,” she says. “This funding demonstrates the federal government’s ongoing commitment to advancing the grains and oilseed sectors. These investments address two key issues facing the sector: better risk management tools and market readiness.”

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Another $789,558 will be used to develop a Code of Practice for farm production of Canadian grains. The codes are voluntary and led by farmers and will help farmers identify practices considered “sustainable” by both the market and and public.

Crop sustainability code of practice taking shape

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The code of practice will cover a range of topics, including fertilizer management, pesticide use, soil management, farm workers, and protection of wildlife habitat, as well as food safety and work safety. According to a news release, the codes will “confirm the confidence shared by consumers around the world that Canadian grains are made to the highest standards of quality.”

“Despite Canada’s solid reputation worldwide as a high quality and trustworthy provider of grain and oilseed products, we cannot take this for granted,” says Tyler Bjornson, president of the CGC. “Exploring new ways to help producers and industry address market access risks, as well as maintain consumer confidence that we are doing the right things to produce sustainable and safe food are an essentially part of our long-term strategy as a sector.”

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